Aspects of Accessibility

Accessibilty options
Various aspects of accessibility

Blind and Low Vision

Blind and Low Vision Icon
Blind and Low Vision Icon

Teachers of the Visually Impaired provide itinerant services to students who are visually impaired.  The form and level of support is dictated by the intensity of need as outlined in the students Individual Education Plan (IEP).  Goals pertain to academic achievement, social/emotional development, communication, technology, advocacy, mobility, orientation, etc.  In addition, the Teacher of the Visually Impaired facilitates networking between students and their families, and community-based personnel.

From:  Student Support Manual of Programs and Services
(District Based Support Personnel)

Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Icon

Teachers of the Deaf or Hard of Hearing (TDHHs) provide itinerant services to students who are deaf or hard of hearing.  The form and level of support is dictated by the intensity of need as outlined in the students Individual Education Plan (IEP).  Goals pertain to audiology, academic achievement, social/emotional development, listening, communication, speech reading, self-advocacy, appreciation of Deaf culture, etc.  In addition, TDHHs facilitate networking between students and their families and community based personnel, and also creates opportunities through which students can interact with peers who are deaf or hard of hearing.

From:  Student Support Manual of Programs and Services
(District Based Support Personnel)

Physical and Motor Skills

Physical and Motor Skills
Physical and Motor Skills

Physiotherapists (PTs) provide services to children with orthopedic, neurological, muscular, spinal, joint or sensory dysfunction.  PTs conduct assessments, and work as members of a collaborative team to assist with the development of interventions, equipment selection/adaptation, and program planning.  PTs also assist students with physical positioning that promotes optimal physical access, provide assistance in maximizing independence for students who have limited mobility, and offer suggestions to facilitate functional movement.

Occupational Therapists (OTs) work to promote, maintain, and develop the functional skills students require to function in an educational setting.  OTs conduct assessments, and consult and assist with educational teams with respect to program planning, equipment selection and environmental or other adaptations.

Occupational Therapists (Sensory) conduct assessments and develop educational plans that enable educational teams to address sensory needs (e.g., auditory, visual, tactile) so as to enable students in their ability to function in an educational setting.

Speech and Language

Speech and Language
Speech and Language

Augmentative Communication Specialists are speech-language pathologists who specialize in working with students who have severe difficulties in producing or understanding oral communication.  AACs provide consultation and training in the use of augmentative or alternative communication systems that may include visual supports, communication boards and books, or voice output communication systems.  AACs collaborate with the school-based speech and language pathologist, teachers, EAs, integration support teachers, parent/guardians and other team members to develop and implement personalized communication systems.

From:  Student Support Manual of Programs and Services
(District Based Support Personnel)

Literacy and Learning

Literacy and Learning
Literacy and Learning Icon

The Learner Support Team Teacher plays an active role in the identification, assessment, planning, implementation, reporting, evaluation, and case management for students who do not have a formal special education designation, yet are experiencing academic challenges at school.  Learner Support Teachers (LST) also work with students learning English (English Language Learners)

From:  Student Support Manual of Programs and Services
(District Based Support Personnel)

Input Management

Input Management Icon
Input Management

Another aspect one needs to consider is the environment for learning.  Is the environment too stimulating or not stimulating enough.  Does facing a blank wall or colour help or hinder the students’ abilities to focus on the task at hand. 

If you are going to use an iPad app, is it quickly accessible, or do you have 5 or 6 swipes to find the app you need?

For “Using iPads with Students who have CVI or Multiple Impairments,” the article suggests 8 considerations including:

Visual Complexity, Novelty, Colour Preference, Visual field preference, light gazing, visual latency, distance, and movement.

http://www.pathstoliteracy.org/blog/using-ipads-students-who-have-cvi-or-multiple-impairments